World of lies, misinformation can be deadly

It’s up to each of us to do the work of sorting out the truth if we don’t want to be manipulated like so many puppets.

To the editor:

I applaud the letter from Jean P. Moore who provides data showing the Black Lives Matter movement is not an anarchist, Marxist group. However, I must note that many people in our country seem to not want to consider facts and data, so her hard work in digging up the facts may be for nothing. This is a situation I lament. It is tragic that many people are willing to accept slogans and labels as reality. It’s also dangerous. History has shown us that when people swallow whole the unexamined accusations against others, we’ve had wars. Communities are scarred and people die.

Our country’s current president is famous for spewing misinformation, such as “the coronavirus is a hoax.” Some people are dead from believing this. Trump’s habit of throwing lies around that serve his purpose is shamefully irresponsible of him and his cronies.

But what about all the citizens who take what they hear or read at face value? I’m especially concerned about our youth. Are they being educated to think critically? To question assumptions? To read several different sources (liberal/conservative/neutral) when the topic is important? To ask, “Are you sure?” or “How do you know?”.

Like the clever advertising industry that knows how to sell us anything by playing on emotions of fear or the desire to look and smell as good as the next guy, politicians can also use words to incite fears, mistrust, hatred and insecurities. It’s up to each of us to do the work of sorting out the truth if we don’t want to be manipulated like so many puppets. And then vote accordingly.

Sharon Coleman

Great Barrington