Nature’s Turn special photo edition, May 9, 2020

To take the sting away, especially spring snow is known as “poor man’s fertilizer."

Mount Washington — When a blanket of mountain snow and temperatures in the 20’s, with a windchill in the teens, befalls gardeners and our gardens on a May day, we like to think that the ground has received a gift from heaven. Nitrogen and other elements in the atmosphere that feed the soil are captured in snow as it falls. These are released into the ground as the snow melts. A deep snow cover through winter contributes some fraction of heaven-sent fertilizer to the ground. To take the sting away, especially spring snow is known as “poor man’s fertilizer.”

 

 

Tender daffodil blossom bows under weight of the crystalline coverlet.

 

Male downy woodpecker breakfasts on seed and suet against a backdrop of snow-covered hemlock forest.
Rhubarb, almost ready to harvest, catches a wallop.