Marion E. Oleen, 72, of Sheffield

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By Wednesday, Oct 1 Obituaries
Marion E. Oleen

Sheffield — Marion E. Oleen, 72, passed away on September 25, 2014 at her home surrounded by her family.

Born on November 11, 1941, Marion was the daughter of the late Philip and Alice Peterson Eckert. She and her husband George were married on September 25, 1965 in Hempstead, N.Y. She and George moved to the area more than 32 years ago and raised their two sons here.

Marion was very involved in her church and served on the Altar Guild at Christ Church Episcopal for many years. She was also a bus driver for the local school district.

Along with her husband, George Oleen, Marion is survived by her sons Christopher Oleen, his wife Regina and their son Nicholas of Sheffield and her son John Oleen of Waterbury, Vt. She also leaves her brother Richard Eckert and his wife Barbara of New Hampshire, sister-in-law Margaret (Peg) Kenyon and her husband Greg of Sheffield as well as four nephews.

Marion’s funeral will take place on Monday, October 6, 2014 at 1 p.m. at Christ Church Episcopal, Main Street, Sheffield with The Rev. Annie Ryder presiding. There will be no calling hours and burial will be private at the family’s convenience.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to either Christ Church Episcopal or HospiceCare in the Berkshires through Finnerty & Stevens Funeral Home who is in charge of arrangements.


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