Forced resignation from ambulance board ‘constitutes cancel culture at its worst’

Even if the death toll more than doubles, two-tenths of one percent falls within the definition of the word "miniscule."

To the editor:

A front-page story in the Berkshire Eagle on July 24 about Robert Moulton is deeply disturbing. If, as seems to be the case, the North Adams Ambulance board of directors forced Mr. Moulton to resign, then the other members of that board should resign en masse.

Disciplining someone for views that have nothing to do with his or her performance or ability constitutes cancel culture at its worst and should not be tolerated.

Regarding Mr. Moulton’s views, people should remember that Black Lives Matter was often labeled a terrorist organization during the Obama administration. If it is, the fact that the public now has more sympathy for Black Lives Matter doesn’t change its nature. Mr. Moulton’s attempt to spur public discourse about an important public matter should be applauded, not condemned.

Regarding his views on the coronavirus, not only should Mr. Moulton be applauded for encouraging public discourse, but he is correct. The number of worldwide deaths from the coronavirus, most of them in the over-65 age group, is less than one-tenth of one percent of the world’s population. Even if the death toll more than doubles, two-tenths of one percent falls within the definition of the word “miniscule.” The media and politicians have scare-mongered the public into thinking that death from the virus constantly lurks just around the corner.

Our democratic system requires that all viewpoints be constantly aired and debated. Stifling viewpoints that are contrary to politically correct dogma is known as “groupthink.” It inevitably leads to tyranny.

Richard Allen
North Egremont