Thursday, July 18, 2024

News and Ideas Worth Sharing

Bits & Bytes: Marc Cohn at Colonial; healing foods discussion; Olana art for kids; food pantry benefit concert; ‘Small Steps to a Healthier You’

Berkshire Music School teacher Tari Wheeler Roosa (flute), Joshua Birns-Sprague (piano, organ, and flute) and special guest Daniel Broad (double bass) will give a concert Feb. 25 at First United Methodist Church to benefit local food pantries.

Berkshire Theatre Group to welcome Marc Cohn

Pittsfield — Berkshire Theatre Group will welcome singer/songwriter Marc Cohn to the Colonial Theatre on Thursday, February 25, at 8 p.m.

Singer-songwriter and pianist Marc Cohn burst onto the scene in 1991 with his Top 40 hit song “Walking In Memphis,” which earned him a Best New Artist Grammy Award. Cohn’s short-story songwriting style is heavily influenced by Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, and Jackson Browne, and he is often named among the most personal and introspective lyricists of his generation.

As important as Cohn’s signature song is, loyal fans know that “Walking in Memphis” is not only a great opening track on a classic record, but the beginning of a larger story that continues to this day. With his band Cohn will perform songs from his latest album “Join The Parade” as well as his hits, including “Ghost Train,” “Silver Thunderbird,” “Perfect Love,” and “True Companion.”

Tickets are $40. For tickets and more information, see the Berkshire Edge calendar or contact the Colonial ticket office at (413) 997-4444.

–E.E.

*     *     *

Williams College to host discussion on the healing power of food

cindygeyer2
Cindy Geyer.

Williamstown — Integrative and lifestyle medicine expert Cindy Geyer will present a lecture entitled “The Healing Power of Food” at Williams College on Tuesday, February 23, at 7 p.m. in Griffin Hall, room 3. In her lecture Geyer will discuss how what people eat impacts their moods, energy, and health. She will also talk about how to navigate conflicting nutritional advice to cultivate a nourishing relationship with food. The event is free and open to the public.

Geyer received her Bachelor of Science and medical degrees from Ohio State University and completed her residency in internal medicine at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, N.Y. In addition to her role as Medical Director at Canyon Ranch, Geyer is a core faculty member at the Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s “Food as Medicine” conference. She serves on the Pittsfield Board of Health and is an active member of the Healthy Pittsfield partnership, and is also a board member and representative to the Executive Board of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine.

For building locations on the Williams campus, consult the online map or call the Office of Communications at (413) 597-4277.

–E.E.

*     *     *

‘Art in the Morning for Preschoolers’ at Olana

Hudson, N.Y. — The Olana State Historic Site’s newest series for little ones is called “Art in the Morning for Preschoolers.” Caregivers and their 3- to 5-year-olds are invited to drop in at Olana’s Wagon House Education Center on the last Wednesday of every month to make art or complete a special project. The first program of the series will be offered on Wednesday, February 24, from 10 a.m.-noon. Participants will be able to build their very own terrariums.

The cost of the program is $10 per child and is free for adult caregivers. For more information see the Berkshire Edge calendar call Olana’s Education Department at 518-828-1872 x105.

–E.E.

*     *     *

Food pantry benefit concert

Pittsfield – Berkshire Music School teacher Tari Wheeler Roosa (flute), Joshua Birns-Sprague (piano, organ, and flute) and special guest Daniel Broad (double bass) will give a concert on Saturday, February 27, at 1 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church. The program features an eclectic mix of music and will include compositions by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Claude Bolling, Claude Debussy, Scott Joplin, Tsuneo Imahori, as well as an organ improvisation by Joshua Birns-Sprague.

Free will donations will be accepted and proceeds will benefit the local food pantries. For more information call (413) 243-4912.

–E.E.

*     *     *

“Small Steps to a Healthier You” weekly program

Pittsfield — Beginning on Thursday, February 25, at 10:45 a.m., the Jewish Federation of the Berkshires will collaborate with Berkshire Health Systems on a a five-session program titled “Small Steps to a Healthier You.” The free program will continue on the four successive Thursdays in March at Congregation Knesset Israel.

On the first day, the program will offer glucose and cholesterol screening for those who haven’t had blood work within the last six months and who commit to participating in the entire program. The remaining four sessions will educate participants on how to make life changes and become healthier. Topics will include eating better, moving more, cultivating joy and a sense of purpose, setting reachable goals; and reducing stress. Katie Mead, BSN, RN, and Health Educator in Community Outreach for Berkshire Health Systems will lead the sessions.

The program is open to a limited number of participants. To register call the Care Coordinating Hub with Berkshire Health Systems at (413) 445-9232. For more information call the Jewish Federation of the Berkshires at (413) 442-4360 x10.

–E.E.

spot_img

The Edge Is Free To Read.

But Not To Produce.

Continue reading

BITS & BYTES: Robert Hartwell at The Mahaiwe; Imani Winds at Norfolk Chamber Music Festival; Rizo at Ancram Center for the Arts; Natty &...

In June of 2020, you saw a Black gay man purchase a white house in Great Barrington in cash and it gave you hope.

BITS & BYTES: Edward Merritt at the Turley Gallery; Sarah Martinez and Ali Gibbons at David M. Hunt Library; Literary celebration at The Clark;...

Part social practice, part painting, Merritt’s works evoke a garden formed from detritus and climate anxiety.

CONNECTIONS: For my friends in Mount Washington, a Mount Washington tale

Now here was sauce for the historian: a letter written by a man about his own family. It would be rich in information with no unanswered questions, or would it?

The Edge Is Free To Read.

But Not To Produce.