EYES TO THE SKY: Vernal equinox, Mercury at dusk, NEAF

More Info
By Monday, Mar 20 Learning  2 Comments
Neil deGrasse Tyson on the line live at the 2015 Northeast Astronomy Forum.

March 20 – April 2, 2017

http://earthsky.org/tonight/equal-day-and-night-on-equinox

http://earthsky.org/tonight/equal-day-and-night-on-equinox

Mt. Washington — By the sun’s path in the sky today – and not far off as March turns to April – we can read that spring has arrived in the northern hemisphere. As day dawns at 6:29 a.m. on the 20th, the sun reaches the midpoint of its journey between the extremes marked by the winter and summer solstices. On this, the vernal equinox, let’s pause together to notice sunrise due east on the horizon and the higher arc our star draws as it climbs and then descends to its due west position on the skyline. Sunrise is at 6:57 a.m., sunset at 7:05 p.m. on the 20th. We’ve come through the dark days of winter to the time of equal day and night.

Venus plunges toward the western horizon even as Mercury rises into view. Sky & Telescope diagram

Venus plunges toward the western horizon even as Mercury rises into view. Sky & Telescope diagram

Half an hour after sunset, at a location with a clear view to the western horizon, begin to look for planet Mercury. Venus might still put in an appearance where sky and land meet, close to the lower right of Mercury on the 20th and 21st. Binoculars will be helpful. The Messenger of the Gods planet might best be seen on the 29th when it will have climbed higher above the horizon and our eyes will be guided by a young moon poised to its left. On the 30th, the waxing moon appears to the left of Mars, which is located above Mercury.

Venus leaves the western evening sky this week only to return as the Morning Star before sunrise in the east. The brilliant goddess planet rises about an hour before sunrise as March ends.

Look for Mercury and Mars every evening at dusk. The moon appears to the left of Mercury on March 29 and left of Mars on the 30th.

Look for Mercury and Mars every evening at dusk. The moon appears to the left of Mercury on March 29 and left of Mars on the 30th.

Every year as spring begins, astronomy enthusiasts from far and wide converge at the Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF), at Rockland Community College in Suffern, New York, a 2- to 3-hour drive from western Massachusetts. NEAF 2017 takes place the weekend of April 8 – 9. Once again, the Rockland Astronomy Club has organized an irresistible line-up of celebrated presenters in the main auditorium as well as formal and informal opportunities for interaction with knowledgeable professionals, amateurs and purveyors of everything related to the study and enjoyment of astronomy.

Opportunities to Participate

April – October, Saturdays at 9 p.m. Public Observatory Observing at the Wilder Observatory, Amherst College: http://amherstastronomy.org/ http://amherstastronomy.org/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=611&Club=1

April 8 & 9, 2017 – Northeast Astronomy Forum: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CU5OL24XtRM&feature=youtu.be

Watch for the waxing crescent moon to meet up with Mars on March 30 and the Pleiades star cluster on March 31. The green line depicts the ecliptic – Earth’s orbital plane projected onto the constellations of the zodiac.

Watch for the waxing crescent moon to meet up with Mars on March 30 and the Pleiades star cluster on March 31. The green line depicts the ecliptic – Earth’s orbital plane projected onto the constellations of the zodiac.

http://www.rocklandastronomy.com/index.html

https://rockland-astronomy-club.myshopify.com/collections/neaf

Resources

NEAF 2016: http://theberkshireedge.com/eyes-sky-neaf-astronomy-enthusiasts-oasis/

Sun and Earth – seasons quick: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUW51lvIFjg

Astronomy of the seasons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taHTA7S_JGk


Return Home

2 Comments   Add Comment

  1. Susan Bachelder says:

    And what a sunrise it is! As clear as a bell with moon set and Jupiter hustling off to the west. If it is this clear tonight it will be a great Mercury, Venus viewing (my favorite tag team!) at sunset. Thanks for your posts.

  2. judy isacoff says:

    Joys and more joys to know our eyes alighted on Jupiter together this grand morning, Susan, and Saturn with the moon, Altair and Vega above. Sun glistened in the hemlocks as it rose, late getting over the hills here, marking due east for the rest of the season’s navigation. Thanks for being in touch.

What's your opinion?

We welcome your comments and appreciate your respect for others. We kindly ask you to keep your comments as civil and focused as possible. If this is your first time leaving a comment on our website we will send you an email confirmation to validate your identity.

At issue in Southern Berkshire: Are small schools worth keeping?

Tuesday, Jun 6 - The superior experience most parents say their kids have in the very small schools has less to do with scale, and more to do with quality teaching and the right kind of leadership. -- Susan Engel, director of the Program in Teaching at Williams College, and a resident of New Marlborough

The curious accomplishment of Benjamin Zoeller

Tuesday, May 30 - While most high school students dream of presents and maybe even a chance to go skiing during Winter break, let alone catching up on sleep, Ben Zoeller decided to sit down, and, well ... write a full-length drama.

EYES TO THE SKY: The Sun

Monday, May 29 - This glorious image, a tour-de-force of 21st-century science, reveals solar dynamics crucial to our awareness of our planet in space as well as teaching us about the universe of stars beyond Earth.