Bits & Bytes: Gardening in climate change; ‘Is the Moon Still There When Nobody Looks?’; CHP Walking Loop Trail guided hike; NMVA winter house concert

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By Monday, Jan 8 Life In the Berkshires
Gardener, author and photographer Ken Druse will deliver the Berkshire Botanical Garden Annual Winter Lecture Saturday, Jan. 13, at Lenox Memorial Middle & High School. Photo courtesy Berkshire Botanical Garden

Winter Lecture to focus on gardening in climate change

Lenox — Berkshire Botanical Garden will hold is 21st annual Winter Lecture Saturday, Jan. 13, at 2 p.m. at Lenox Memorial Middle and High School with the illustrated talk “The New Shade Garden: Creating a Lush Oasis in the Age of Climate Change” presented by lecturer, photographer and author Ken Druse.

Druse has published 20 garden books in the last 25 years. The American Horticultural Society listed his first large-format work, “The Natural Garden,” among the best books of all time. His book “Making More Plants” won the award of the year from the Garden Writers Association, which awarded him its 2013 gold medal for photography and silver medal for writing. In 2013, the Smithsonian Institution announced the acquisition of the Ken Druse Garden Photography Collection, comprising 45,000 images of American gardens and plants. In addition, the Garden Club of America presented him with the Sarah Chapman Francis medal for lifetime achievement in garden communication.

Tickets are $45 for the general public and $35 for BBG members and include a post-lecture reception. For tickets and more information, see the Berkshire Edge calendar or contact BBG at (413) 320-4794. The snow date for the event is Sunday, Jan. 14.

–E.E.

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Scoville Library to host quantum physics presentation

Matthew Deady. Photo courtesy Bard College

Salisbury, Conn. — On Thursday, Jan. 11, at 6 p.m., the Scoville Memorial Library will host physics professor Matthew Deady for a presentation titled “Is the Moon Still There When Nobody Looks? An Introduction to Quantum Physics.”

Quantum mechanics is the most successful physical theory ever developed, though its foundations and interpretations have remained an ongoing dispute over the last century. Among its counterintuitive consequences are Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, the role of the observer as captured in the Schrödinger’s cat paradox, and the “spooky action at a distance” exemplified in entanglement experiments. Deady’s talk will provide a historical survey of quantum mechanics leading up to current experiments and theories that weigh on the questions that beset Einstein, Bohr and others.

Deady is the director of the physics program at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, where he has been teaching since 1987. He received his doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was an assistant professor of physics at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts. His current research includes nuclear physics, mathematical physics and musical acoustics. He has been published in journals including Physical Review, Technology Review and the American Journal of Physics.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the Scoville Memorial Library at (860) 435-2838 or scovlibn@biblio.org.

–E.E.

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The Community Health Programs Walking Loop of the Threemile Hill Trail. Photo courtesy Great Barrington Land Conservancy

Guided winter hike to be offered on CHP Walking Loop trail

Great Barrington — Christine Ward of the Great Barrington Land Conservancy and Mariah Auman of Berkshire Natural Resources Council will lead a winter hike/showshoe Saturday, Jan. 13, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Community Health Programs Walking Loop trail at 444 Stockbridge Rd. Great Barrington.

The hike will cover an easy, 1.5-mile loop with a gradual elevation change through scenic fields and woodland. Hikers are asked to meet at the trailhead kiosk in the CHP parking area. Hikers may bring their own showshoes or rent a pair from Berkshire Bike & Board.

The hike is free and open to the public. Families are encouraged to attend and hikers are asked to pre-register by contacting info@gbtrails.org or Mariah at (413) 499-0596.

–E.E.

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New Marlborough Village Association to present winter house concert

Manon Hutton-Dewys. Photo: Donald McClelland

New Marlborough — The New Marlborough Village Association hass announced that it will present a winter house concert Sunday, Jan. 14, at 4 p.m. with New Marlborough’s resident concert pianist Manon Hutton-Dewys and violinist Emily Vold. The program will include works by women composers Marianna Auenbrugger, Clara Schumann and Ruth Crawford as well as the Edvard Grieg Violin Sonata in in G Minor, Op. 13. The performance will last approximately one hour and be followed by a reception with wine and hors d’oeuvres. Tickets are $20 for NMVA members and $25 for nonmembers. For tickets and information, contact NMVA at (413) 229-2785 or contact@newmarlborough.org.

–E.E.


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